Weight Loss and Life Occur in the Present

Weight Loss and Life Occur in the Present

Someone, I am not quite sure of the author, once said, “Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift – that is why we call it the present.” Anyone who has ever lost weight has been faced with that moment where he or she was forced to make a decision, to move through an obstacle, to conquer a fear. To lose weight you must live in the present.

I met a man today. The man was about my height but he weighed perhaps close to 400 pounds. After we engaged in small talk for several moments, I asked him whether we was ready to change his life and his weight. He wasn’t. Maybe I wasn’t the one to deliver the message to this man, perhaps mine was not even the correct message for him. Perhaps the time was not perfect for him.

How much of your life is lost either dwelling on the past or worrying about the future? When your thoughts are imprisoned by the past or fearful of the future you miss out on one of life’s greatest gifts: that which is happening today and indeed this very moment.

When your mind (and therefore your energy) is focused on yesterday or tomorrow, your involvement in the present moment is impoverished and today passes you by as a squandered opportunity or an unnoticed stranger.
How often have you felt yourself being pulled back by yesterday? “I’ll never be able to lose weight. I’ve always struggled with my weight. I want to change but I’m scared to move on,” I have said all of these things to myself. Perhaps you have said those same things to yourself. Perhaps the man I spoke with today said those very things to himself. Perhaps not.

The reality is that when you are hoping and praying your weight will change by grasping onto what was or what may be some day – your ability to move forward will be confined by your inability to make the most of today. Throw off the shackles of fear, indecisiveness, uncertainty and free yourself for the life that awaits you.

The key is putting your effort into today. Putting your effort into the present moment. By doing so, you will reap the rewards of seeing the world in a fundamentally new and fresh way. Awareness of the present will provide you with a feeling of control of your life. You must feel that you have some degree of control over your life before you can really deal with your weight.

We all enjoy reminiscing about the past and planning for the future, but after you’ve done so, let these things go. Today is what really matters, irrespective of how imperfect it might seem. It is your attitude, your intention, your focus towards today that counts.

You may have control over very little today but one thing is for certain – you can choose pay close attention to the present. For example, the next time a stranger approaches you and strikes up a conversation quell the storm by reining in your mind and your actions to that moment, the present. Find your way back to the perfect present and the world will open up to you with all of today’s wonderful opportunities.

Oh, by the way, yesterday, I met another man while standing in line. He was morbidly obese. We made small talk, I asked him the question, “Is today the day you change your life and your weight?” He said, “Yes.”

Presenting Information Well, Too Difficult for Web Developers?

Web site design has gone through many evolutions with techniques coming and going. Most of this evolution has revolved around page layout and site navigation, today a modern site does indeed present a clear and easy experience for the visitor. However one area that seems to have been neglected is the display of numerical information. Perhaps this is due, in part, to that fact that not every site has numerical data to display or perhaps web designers are so focused on ‘look and feel’ that they neglect the clarity of information.

Getting visitors to a site is quite a task as we all know. So when we get them there we want them stay and understand the content. If that content involves numerical data then isn’t it worth making a little extra effort to present that data in a format that is both pleasing to the eye and enticing. So how do we do that? Well when you start to think about it, it really isn’t any different to the way we approach general site design. Today we wouldn’t dream of just chucking all the content at random on a page and expecting the visitor to make sense of it. So rather than just take the raw numbers and throw them into a table let’s give it a little thought. Think about what the data could be saying to user and then start to break it down into headline numbers and paragraphs as you would do with text information.

Numerical data can usually be quite easily segmented and totaled. Summing sections of data provide headline attention grabbing numbers, whilst segmenting provides the opportunity to paragraph the data making far more information easily accessible and far more interesting for the viewer. For example, let’s suppose we have a whole series of sales data and let’s imagine our organisation sells four products. Our raw data is a set of individual sales numbers. Simply placing this data in one big table, although displaying all the data, does not really provide very much information. For instance a normal user would have no idea which product is most popular or whether there are any trends or seasonal variations. With a little thought and effort we can do much better, let’s start by segmenting our sales figures by month and then within each month segment further by product. For each product / month cell we have two numbers, the total value of sales and the number of sales. Providing this in just a simple table will be far more meaningful than our original raw data set. The user can now begin to see which product is performing well and also whether any particular time of year is good or bad. However we can still do much better.

Even at this level of segmentation we are still making the viewer work to see the story contained within the data. Now that we have the data sensibly segmented it becomes a fairly easy task to display in graphical format. Done well graphs are extremely powerful because they both present information in a visual format and add dimension to the data. Relationships between adjacent data and trends across the range are made crystal clear. Choosing the correct chart style is key for making this work really well. Should we use pie charts, bar graphs, line graphs and something more exotic. In our sales data example remember we are looking to provide some attention grabbing headline followed by a paragraph of interesting detail. A viewer of our information may first be most interested in which of our products is the best performing. Although a bar graph of total sales for each product would provide this information, a pie chart representing the product totals would be more attention grabbing. So for our headline let’s provide the user with a pie chart of total sales. Now all we need to do is provide the paragraph, well the choice with our example data is a multi-series vertical bar chart. We have a series of data for each product segmented by month. Along the x-axis we will plot month and the y-axis will represent value of sales. Each month on the graph will contain 3 bars, one for each product. This simple approach provides the viewer with a great deal of information in one pleasing view. The bar chart tells the complete sales story for each of our products showing both trends and easy visual comparisons.

That’s all well and good, I hear you say, but web pages don’t lend themselves to easily generating graphical display. Well that’s true but there are today a wide variety of software packages that have specifically been designed to plugin to web sites and make the task of turning the numbers into eye catching, story telling graphs easy for the web designer. Generally you set a few options, like colours and then simply provide the segmented data to the software. At page view time your visitor is presented with the graph image.

In summary then, with a little thought and a small amount of effort the numbers can really be brought alive and provide a compelling story for visitors.

How to Give An Excellent Presentation – 3 Important Tips to Improve Your Presentation In College

If you want to learn how to give a good presentation, then you have to pay close attention to this article because I’m going to share with you three of the most important tips that very few people know.

In this article, first, I’m going to talk about how to prepare presentation slides effectively. Second, I will talk about nonverbal communication skills that you can use to direct audience’s attention. Third, I will talk about the ideal timing for your presentation.

First of all, let’s talk about how to organize your slides properly. Good slides will allow your audience to remain focus. So, it is the key to carry out good presentation. The flow of the slides should always start from the introduction, then the presentation outline, the content, and the conclusion. In the introduction phase, you should mention about who you are and what is the theme of your presentation. Try to keep it short and direct. In the presentation outline, you should write out the flow of your presentation to let your audience know what are you going to talk about. In the content area, you should focus on the important parts of your slides. In the conclusion phase, summarize your content in one short paragraph and end the presentation by saying thank you to the audience. Remember to use pictures occasionally. It will help you to attract audience’s attention.

Second, you should focus on nonverbal communication skills. The way you stand, your expression, your hand gestures can affect your overall presentation. Always stand in front of everyone and make sure your audience can see you and your slides. Occasionally, walk towards your audience when you want to emphasize on some key points. This will help you to gain immediate attention. Besides that, do not cross your arms or over using your hand gestures.

Third, you should plan the timing of you presentation. Ideally, you should spend 5% of your time on the introduction, another 5% of your time on the presentation outline, 80% of your time on the content, and 10% of your time on the conclusion. Remember, introduction and presentation outline is only meant to tell your readers about the title and the flow of your presentation. So, please do not spend too much time on it because it does not add value to your audience.

In conclusion, to give good presentation in college, you should always prepare your slides properly, use nonverbal skills effectively, and adjust the timing of presentation correctly. If you follow the tips above, you should be able to deliver good presentation in the future.